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HISTORY

THE COSTA DEL SOL CHARTER OF HELLS ANGELS MC WAS FOUNDED ON THE 28 th OF JULY IN 2.002 IN MALAGA/SPAIN.

 

The Beginning of the Hells Angels Motorcycleclub


On March the 17th. 1948 the first Hells Angels Motorcycle Club was founded in the Fontana/San Bernardino area in the United States of America. About the same time other clubs were formed in various places in the state of California, but none of these clubs were associated neither with Hells Angels nor with each other, and most of them do not exist today. The San Bernardino charter (also called "Berdoo") still exists, although most of its original members at one time moved northwards to Oakland. This removal is probably the reason why many outsiders wrongly describe Oakland as the Mother Charter of Hells Angels MC World.

During the fifties more Hells Angels Charters came into existence. In the beginning the charters had nothing to do with each other, but after some years they united and regular criteria of admission were laid down. From having been exclusively a Californian phenomenon, the club developed internationally in 1961. It happened when the first charter outside California was adopted - strangely enough as far away as Auckland, New Zealand. During the sixties Hells Angels spread out to the East Coast of the USA and later to the Midwest.
On July the 30th. 1969 the first European Hells Angels charter was accepted in London, England and today there are more than 125 charters in Europe alone. In the end of the seventies Australian clubs were admitted and in 1984, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil became the first South American charter. In 1993 Hells Angels came to the African continent with a charter in Johannesburg, South Africa. Eastern Europe got its own Hells Angels charter in the new millennium and since then many more countries have been granted the now famous winged death head.

The admission of clubs all over the globe caused changes in the structure of Hells Angels. The small motorcycle club from Berdoo was now mother charter of the world´s biggest motorcycle brotherhood HELLS ANGELS MOTORCYCLE CLUB WORLD. Today Hells Angels MC World has charters in Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bohemia (Czech Republic), Brazil, Canada, Chile, Croatia, Denmark, England, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Holland, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Lichtenstein, Luxembourg, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Spain, Switzerland, South Africa, Sweden, Turkey, United States and Wales. Clubs from new countries seeking admission are to be found in Japan, Lithuania , Latvia and Romania

Copyright
Lineage Clarification

WRITTEN BY: 'STEW' HAMC Charleston U.S.A.
GRAPHICS: 'CRAIG' .HAMC Wessex England

The myth and legends surrounding the military lineage of the Hells Angels
Motorcycle Club has, for decades, been cited as being from former members of
the Hell's Angels Bomber B-17 Group from World War II. This myth has been
aided by incorrect reporting by authors who deemed it appropriate to align the
Hells Angels Motorcycle Club (HAMC) with ex-service members returning from a
war where excitement and adventure had become their lifestyle. Authors and
newspaper correspondents, from a wide assortment of daily, weekly and other
periodicals have made statements, not founded in fact. It has been stated that
these former servicemen were alleged to have been drunkards, military misfits,
and generally speaking substandard soldiers that would not adjust to a return
to a peacetime environment. If any person, regardless of their association,
considered the content of the statements and inferences made, they would
find these to lack any rational thought or concern for truthful reporting.


A historical review of the exploits and accomplishments of the implied Bomber Group, 303rd Bombardment Groups (Heavy) (303rd) European Theater of Operations (ETO) show's that this bomber unit did not tolerate malcontents, drunken pilots or aircrews. Such individuals, had they existed, would have seriously hindered the effectiveness of combat operations and would have been dealt with harshly and promptly. Documented records of the 303rd can be found in "Might in Flight", Daily Diary of the Eighth Air Force's Hell's Angels, 303rd Bombardment Group (H), by Harry D. Gobrecht, LtCol, USAF (Ret). One of the 303rd's most famous B-17's serial number #41-24577, commanded by then Captain Irl Baldwin, was named "Hell's Angels". This aircraft was unnamed until it's fourth or fifth mission. The crew decided to adopt the name "Hell's Angels" after the 1927 "Hell's Angels" WWI fictional Fighter Squadron movie by Howard Hughes. On 13 May 1943 the 303rd's B-17F "Hell's Angels" became the first 8th Air Force B-17 to complete 25 combat missions. This feat has wrongly been credited to the"Memphis Belle" B-17 including the 1943 and 1990 "Memphis Belle" movies. The "Memphis Belle" B-17 was the first to complete 25 missions and return to the USA. "Hell's Angels" continued to fly combat missions until 13 December 1943, when she completed 48 combat missions it was retired from combat. Shortly thereafter she was flown to the USA, rejoined by members of the Capt Baldwin crew, went on a morale boosting tour of war production plants. "Hell's Angels" B-17F. serial number #41-24577 was dismantled, for scrap, in 1947. On 7 January 1944, by a vote of group and squadron commanders, "Hell's Angels" became the name of the 303rd with "Might in Flight" being retained as the Group motto.



Facts, which have been undeniably proven, show that the 303rd "Hell's Angels" B-17F was only flown by highly dedicated, motivated and mission oriented airmen. They were not malcontents and did not report for mission in a drunken state. Crew pilot and commander, Capt Irl Baldwin, completed a stellar military career, retired as a LtCol, and was awarded numerous valorous and meritorious citation

 

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